Curling is a sport that originated in Scotland in the 16th century, in which a player slides a stone across ice to reach a target. It is now played around the world, particularly in cold climates like Canada. The playing stones used in the early years were simply river rocks about the size of a man's hand. The sport evolved throughout the years, and current stones are 42-lb. polished granite pieces that can cost thousands of dollars each.
 
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Curling is a strategic, challenging, fun and engaging team sport that can be enjoyed by virtually anyone.
There are teams and structured courses for children, youth, adult, visually impaired and wheelchair players.
 
ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CURLING
from the Canadian Curling Association
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Mixed Doubles Curling
First time as an Olympic Sport in Korea 2018

HOW IT IS PLAYED 





 
 
 
OLYMPICS
Curling was a medal sport at the Chamonix 1924 Olympic Winter Games. It was an Olympic demonstration sport in 1932 in Lake Placid, 1936 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, 1964 in Innsbruck, 1988 in Calgary and 1992 in Albertville. It was a medal sport again at the Nagano 1998 Olympic Winter Games. Canada has won gold in men’s curling at the last two Winter Games, and Sweden has won women’s gold at the last two Winter Games

ABOUT THAT SWEEPING
Sweeping adds the element of fitness to curling, because, to be effective, sweeping must be very vigorous. Sweeping slightly melts the ice, which reduces friction between the running stone and the ice. The result is that the stone will curl less, and slide farther. Sweeping is called for when the stone has not been delivered firmly enough, and/or when the shot is aimed “narrow” or inside the broom target. Sweeping can help a rock slide up to additional 15 feet. Top teams control most shots by using aim and weight “within the sweeping zone.

THE OLDEST STONE
The Stirling Stone, which is engraved with a date of the year 1511, is said to be the oldest curling stone in the world. The sport originated in Scotland, where matches were held during the winter on frozen ponds, lochs and marshes. Today’s curling stones, which have handles so that athletes can accurately steer them down a sheet of ice, weigh 19.96 kilograms and are made of dense granite.

 
 
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